Category Archives: Lunch

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Chicken Thighs with Carrot Fries

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It was sometime in the afternoon on a weekday. The baby was at home with my husband and I was on my way home from work. Tears were streaming down my face from lack of sleep, a stressful day at work, and the stress of knowing my child wouldn’t leave my side once I got home. As the tears began to turn into one big ugly cry I pulled into a deserted parking lot and it all came pouring out.

“I am just so tired, Lord. Why won’t this baby sleep? Where did the loving and peaceful relationship with my husband go? Why did you put so many dreams and ambitions in my heart only to let them sink to the bottom of this tear filled lake????”

There it was. The sentence that put everything else into perspective. Why did God place these dreams in my heart for me only to fail at trying to achieve them? That is when I realized that God did not push aside the dreams in my heart, but rather molded them into something so beautifully different. God did fulfill his promises to me, but I had to be open minded to see them.

On December 22, 2015 I gave birth to a beautiful healthy 7 lb 14 oz baby boy. That day, without my knowledge, God began to mold me into a mother and adjust my priorities to reflect this innocent baby’s needs. As I thought back on the birth of my son I realized my expectations didn’t reflect reality and was forced to change my priorities. In this season of the church we are celebrating Pentecost. The birth of the church. I am sure that the apostles did not expect to be filled with the Holy Spirit as it is depicted in Acts, but God gave them grace in that season to redirect their priorities and dreams. That is my challenge for you this season. Ask God where you need to redirect your priorities and dreams. My hope is that as a church we make our community and health a priority this season. Obtaining a healthy life style is about setting priorities. Whether letting the laundry sit a little longer while you cook a new recipe or choosing to play at the park with your kids rather than mowing the lawn. While both laundry and mowing your lawn may feel crucial in the moment ultimately by adjusting priorities such as these we can find that we are a bit happier and healthier.

I hope that the recipe included will help make at least one meal this week a little easier and encourage a healthy life style.

Chicken Thighs with Carrot Fries

Serves 6

Time: 30 minutesIMG_2161

Ingredients: 

  • 6 bone in/skin on- chicken thighs
  • 12 Carrots (medium-large)
  • 2 tsp Salt
  • 2 tsp thyme
  • 2 tsp garlic
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne
  • 1/2 tsp ginger
  • olive oil
  • Mixed greens/salad

Directions: 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Chicken: Rinse and pat dry your chicken thighs. Place on a greased baking sheet. Sprinkle with 1 tsp salt, 1 tsp thyme, 1 tsp garlic, 1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp ginger and 1-2 TBS olive oil

Carrots: peel carrots. Chop off the top and about 1/2 inch off of the bottom. Cut in half and begin to cut carrots into strips. Try to keep them as uniform as possible. Thin edges will burn quickly. Place all carrots into a large bowl and drizzle with 2-4 TBS olive oil, 1 tsp salt, 1 tsp thyme, 1 tsp garlic, 1/4 tsp cayenne. Lay carrots out onto a baking sheet.

Place both carrots and chicken into the oven and cook for 20 minutes.  After the 20 minutes have been completed, make sure the chicken is on the top rack. Turn the oven to broil at 500 degrees. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the skin is crispy and browned. Remove chicken from oven and continue cooking the carrots until they begin to crisp/brown-about 3 minutes.

Enjoy your chicken and carrots with some fresh mixed greens.

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Asparagus and Ricotta Pizza *Gluten Free*

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Hello!  I have been trying out lots of new recipes and this is definitely a favorite. It is unique and very filling. I can go with just 1-2 wraps for a meal and be full for a couple hours.

Ingredients:

GF Naan from Living Gluten and Grain Free – a lot of times I change up recipes, but this one is spot on. Check their site out for more great Gluten and Grain free options. 

Naan

  • 1 Cup Blanched Almond FlourIMG_3035
  • 1 Cup Tapioca Flour (or Arrowroot)
  • 2 Cups Full Fat Organic Canned Coconut Milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon Sea Salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • Pastured Butter or Coconut Oil

Filling

  • 1 cup ricotta cheese
  • 1 bundle asparagus (trimmed and washed)
  • 1 tsp garlic

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Directions:

Start by roasting your asparagus. Preheat the oven to 425 and place asparagus on a pan in a single layer and drizzle with olive oil. Cook for roughly 10 minutes or until it starts to roast (brown)

While the asparagus is cooking begin mixing together all of your gluten free naan ingredients. Combine all ingredients into a bowl and mix. Then heat up a non-stick skillet to medium heat. (In my experience no butter or oil was needed in the cooking process, but feel free to add a little butter or oil to the pan)

Cook the naan just like you would pancakes. Pour 1/4 cup batter into the pan and cook until the bubbles pop and stay open. Flip and cook for another 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat and place on parchment paper or a towel. It will need some space to cool properly so that it doesn’t become soggy.

Once all your Naan is made, mix together your ricotta cheese and garlic. Spread 1-2 TBS onto the naan and top with asparagus. I found that less is more with the ricotta.

 

Feel free to eat it like a pizza or roll it up.

Best served immediately, but can be refrigerated and eaten cold or heated back up in a toaster oven. I would not recommend heating in a microwave as it will get soggy.

 

I hope you try this recipe out and enjoy it as much as I did!

 

Living Satisfied!

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How to build a perfect Thanksgiving Dinner

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Hello!
Building a Thanksgiving Dinner can seem like a daunting task, but with a little bit of planning you can have great success. Here are 5 tips to build an unbelievable Thanksgiving Dinner.

1) The protein.

Thanksgiving protein is typically turkey, but it doesn’t have to be. Choose a protein that you will enjoy. This could be ham, whole chicken, steak, deer, lamb, etc… The biggest thing to remember is to have a lot of it and to cook it appropriately. Here are links to some great recipes.

Basic Turkey: Click here 

Ham: Click Here

Whole Chicken: Click Here

Steak: Click Here

Deer: Click Here

Lamb: Click Here 

2) The over all flavor.

When we think of Thanksgiving we typically think of a big plate full of a variety of foods. You want all of these foods to blend together. When choosing side dishes keep in mind the seasonings you are using in each dish and whether or not you would mind them melding together on your plate.

3) Favorite side dishes.

Side dishes typically include stuffing, sweet potato casserole/mashed potatoes, casseroles, rolls, etc…When choosing your side dishes be sure to try them before the big day. If you have never made them before cook them now to test it out. Thanksgiving isn’t the time to go all out on new dishes. If you have a new dish you think would work great be sure to prepare it at least once prior.

Pick side dishes that are your favorites. Don’t go crazy outside of the box, but stick with the classics that you love! Try to make sure each item you make you will want seconds of. We all know that there will be left overs so pick items that you will be happy to reheat and eat again.

4) Vegetables!

Don’t skip the veggies! Even if you aren’t a huge veggie fan, veggies help even out your plate. Try making vegetable dishes that have lots of flavor. Some of our favorites are stir fried or baked green beans with loves of butter, sliced almonds, and bacon. OR if you are a fan of brussel sprouts check out this recipe *Click here*.

Having a crunchy cooked or fresh vegetable can help diversify your plate by giving it a little bit more texture.

5) Prepping your meal.

The week before Thanksgiving plan out your menu. Then create a shopping list. A great place to do this is PlantoEat.com *click here*. You can upload recipes and it will build your shopping list for you! That way you don’t forget anything.

Begin prepping 2 days in advanced. Cook as much as you can the day before. This will help ease stress. Cooking most of your side dishes the day before leaves you to just reheat the day of. This means that you can really focus on the protein the day of.

Bonus tip:

Relax!! After you follow the tips above and plan out what foods you desire, remember that Thanksgiving is about being together! It is about family and friends and being thankful for all that you have. A delicious plate of food is just a perk. If the meal is stressing you out as for assistance and/or don’t feel bad about skipping out on certain dishes or needing to purchase pre-made meals. Places like Wholefoods, Trader Joe’s, and Sams/Costco have great options that can ease your meal prep time!

 

I hope these tips were helpful! Enjoy!

 

Living Satisfied.

 

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Perfect food for a Brunch!

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Hello!

I wanted to give you all some options to make for an Easter Brunch. _DSC0043Easter is just a week away and if you are like me nothing says Easter like some good food and family time! Holidays such as Easter is a great time to make some new recipes that are bright and colorful. This spread of food is a guarantee  crowd pleaser and will be sure to impress your guests. Feel free to try out some or all of the recipes for your next event.

Salmon (or beef) encroute

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French Toast Casserole with Lemon and Berries

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Asparagus with Hollandaise sauce and Poached Eggs

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Roasted Potatoes

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Ginger Basil Grapefruit (virgin) Mimosas

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Hope you enjoy these recipes!! Have a great Holiday and remember to check back when you have any other food needs.

 

Living Satisfied

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Ginger Basil Grapefruit (virgin) Mimosas

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Yum, Yum, Yum! I LOVED this recipe. Phew! So good. I don’t drink alcohol myself so this was a great alternative. This is a must try. Feel free to add alcohol if you would like!

GINGER BASIL GRAPEFRUIT MIMOSAS _DSC0051

  • 1 grapefruit; plus additional grapefruit for garnish
  • 2 cups of ice
  • 2 bottles of ginger beer (click here) or 3 cans of ginger ale
  • handful of fresh basil
  • 1/4 cup basil simple syrup

Juice one large grapefruit and segment additional grapefruit for garnish if preferred. Fill a pitcher half way with ice. Pour soda, fresh grapefruit juice and simple syrup. Mix well. Garnish with grapefruit slices and fresh basil.

BASIL SIMPLE SYRUP

  • 1  cup sugar
  • 1  cup water
  • 1 cup loosely packed fresh basil

Place sugar and water in a small pan over medium heat until sugar is fully dissolved, about 2 minutes. Add the basil. Allow to steep for 15-20 minutes and strain and discard basil. Place syrup in a glass tupperware container or squeeze bottle if you have it.

This will make a good amount. Feel free to freeze the rest for later use.

Cover and chill for a couple hours.

 

That is it!

Living Satisfied

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Asparagus with Hollandaise Sauce and Poached Eggs

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This recipe is perfect for so many different occasions. One of my favorite times to have this recipe is for brunch. It is a great option when everything else is sweet.

This recipe takes maybe 15 minutes total to complete. While it does take some fines,  it is not as difficult as you think.

 

Ingredients: _DSC0048

  • 1-2 packs of asparagus
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • 2-4 eggs (to poach)
Hollandaise sauce:
  • 3 egg yolks from large eggs
  • 1/2 pound unsalted butter melted
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

Directions:

These directions will be placed in order so that all can begin cooking at the same time. You will probably want a second person helping. :)

Asparagus: Trim the ends off of the asparagus and rinse. Begin heating a flat pan on the stove top with a Tbs of olive oil on medium heat.

Hollandaise sauce: 

Take a small pot and fill 1/2 way with water. Bring to a boil and then reduce to medium-low heat. Place a glass or metal bowl on top, just like you would if you were melting chocolate.

Poached egg: 

Take a medium size pan with fairly high edges and fill 1/2 way with water. Bring the water to a simmer. It should look like champagne bubbling. Add 1-2 TBS white vinegar.

Asparagus: once the pan is heated up add asparagus in a line and lightly salt. Let them cook for about 10 minutes. Move them around a couple times while they are cooking. They will be ready when a fork can easily go through them. You want it to still be a bit crunchy.

Poached egg: Once the water is bubbling (NOT BOILING) and you have added the vinegar, begin to spin the water. Crack and drop in the eggs one at a time while the water is moving. This will help them begin to stick together. Let cook for a couple minutes. Once the white is cooked you are done. Pull the eggs and place gently into ice water. This wills top the cooking process.

Hollandaise sauce: Begin melting your butter in the microwave. You want it to be just melted, roughly 30 seconds.

  • Separate your yolks from the whites.
  • In a small saucepan set over low heat, whisk 2 egg yolks into a 2 tablespoons of the melted butter. Continue whisking the butter into the egg mixture, 2 teaspoons at a time, until all the butter is thoroughly incorporated into the sauce. The sauce will be thick, smooth, and glossy.Whisk the lemon juice and salt into the hollandaise sauce, and then continue stirring it for 1 minute. Remove the sauce from the heat, place a cover over it, and then serve it over the roasted asparagus and poached eggs once it is done cooking.

 

There it is!! I highly recommend this recipe. It not only tastes great, but will definitely impress your guests.

 

Living Satisfied

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Homemade Chicken and Dumplings (revised)

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Hello!

Ok, so my chicken and dumplings recipe has always been very popular from the beginning. However, throughout the last _DSC0033year or so I have learned a lot about what it means to eat real whole foods. So I would like to revise the recipe and give a much better, homemade item!

The biscuits I used were homemade sourdough biscuits. If you do not use sourdough feel free to make your own or you can choose to purchase pre made dough from your local grocery. I would highly suggest making your own! I am always for making it yourself that way you can control the quality ingredients you put in to the recipe. :)

The next thing I want to mention is to make your own chicken broth!! DO IT! NOW! It is so incredibly easy and tastes 1000x better and has so many more great vitamins and minerals than store-bought!

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups chicken broth (homemade recipe)_DSC0010
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2 pack of biscuit dough (about 6 biscuits) cut into fourths
  • 5 small red potatoes
  • 3-4 peeled and chopped carrots
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • meat from 1/2 of 1 whole chicken (shredded)
  • Any other veggies you would like: broccoli, kale, greens, etc… :)
  • 1 tsp cayenne
  • 1 TBS salt or to taste
  • You can add any other spices you would like or keep it simple!

 

Directions:

Start with making your broth: Take 1 whole organic chicken, place in crock pot, add 1 cup water, and cook for 4-6 hours or until done. They usually cook faster than you would think.

Remove chicken, let cool, and de-bone. You will probably prefer to de-bone while it is still warm because the meat will remove easier. Place the bones back into the crock pot, add 1 onion, 5-6 peeled carrots, 3 stocks celery, and 3-4 cloves garlic. Cook for 12-24 hours in crock pot. I usually cook overnight and my crockpot automatically moves to “warm”.

Note: If you are brave…add 2 chicken feet! You can get these from the farmer’s market and dramatically changes the broth! Seriously life changing! BE SURE to get the feet local and organic!

SOUP:

Add 6 cups broth OR all the broth from your crock pot. If your pot ended up not making 6 cups, I would simply add water _DSC0005until you reach the amount

Add chopped potatoes, 1 cup heavy whipping cream, biscuit dough, and any other veggies you would like.

Cook on medium heat for 30 minutes or until potatoes are done. Then add chicken until warmed.

 

That’s it! SO EASY! This recipe takes 1 day to prepare, but is so worth it! Cooking whole chickens are a great option and you always get broth afterwards! Great for the cooler weather coming!

 

Living Satisfied.

 

 

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Tilapia with Creamy Avocado Sauce

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Hello! Sorry for missing last week! Life got a bit crazy.

This week I want to share with you a Tilapia Recipe! Now, it is important to add that not all fish are created equal. Getting a high quality, fresh fish is very important. So be sure that your fish is fresh caught, not farm raised. It is ok if it is frozen, but make sure you find out where it came from! :)

This recipe I actually concocted myself. I’d seen avocado sauces on a variety of dishes, but I really wanted some fish this night, so I went for making my own. All the spices can be adjusted to taste. Feel free to play around with it and taste as you go!

Ingredients:_DSC0105

  • 2 filets Tilapia (fresh as you can get)
  • 1 cup Broth (Homemade Chicken Broth if you have some)
  • 1/2 avocado
  • 1/2-1 cup almond flour (where to buy)
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp basil
  • any other spices you feel led to include!

Directions

Set oven on Broil. Rinse off tilapia. Prepare a oven safe pan with foil and/or some oil on the bottom to help it not stick. Place tilapia on oiled surface and put a piece of butter on top, roughly 1/2 TBS. What ever feels right. *Don’t stick it in the oven yet!*

While oven is warming, in a small sauce pan bring broth to a boil, then reduce heat to simmer. Add in the rest of the ingredients EXCEPT almond flour. Let simmer on medium/low heat for a couple minutes to reduce a bit. Using a whisk or a emersion blender, combine ingredients to a creamy texture. *It might not be to creamy at first*

Now place tilapia in oven for 2-3 minutes, flip and repeat another 2-3 minutes until it flakes apart with a fork.

Once tilapia is in the oven, begin adding the almond flour to the sauce a little bit at a time, while whisking. Or use emersion blender. Keep adding flour slowly until it is to the texture you would like. It will take more almond flour to get a creamy texture than regular flour.

Top Tilapia with Creamy Avocado sauce. Serve with a nice salad, asparagus, or any other veggie of choice!

 

Hope you all enjoy this quick and easy recipe!

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Baking with a SourDough Starter

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Friends! I Finally have a new post for you all! This post is FILLED with information, but I will start with my recipe and photo. I had been wanting to start a sourdough starter for quite some time now. However, I knew that I needed a bit of free time to figure it all out. Lucky for you, I did the experimenting and research myself and placed in this one post. I could not be happier with this bread! I’ve made a fair amount of bread in the past couple of years, but Gluten is sadly not always my friend. While this bread is NOT gluten free, the amount of gluten remaining after the proofing periods is a lot less than normal bread. This makes it much easier to digest and enjoy. I personally try to limit the intake of this bread, nevertheless. I mainly make it for my husband who LOVES it for his lunches.

NOTE: While this is classified as Sourdough bread. It really isn’t very sour at all. It really depends on how long you let the dough proof and which type of sourdough starter you use. 

Ingredients:_DSC0447

    • 2 1/3 cup fresh sourdoughstarter
    • 3 1/3 cups flour
    • 1 to 1 1/2 cups water
    • Scant TBS salt
    • cast iron dutch oven

Lodge Color EC6D43 Enameled Cast Iron Dutch Oven, Island Spice Red, 6-Quart

Directions:

  1. Mix sourdough starter, flour and salt together. Use enough water to make the bread dough. (you want it to be on the moist side)
  2. Knead the dough until it passed the “window pane test”. I HIGHLY recommend watching this video _DSC0450
     NOTE: I highly recommend watching the video and kneading this dough the first couple times by hand! You never want to
    over knead the dough, Doing it by hand will allow you to feel how the dough changes, it is pretty remarkable! Then after a couple times, you can use your kitchen aid with dough hook, or what ever else you enjoy. 
  3. At this point you can do a couple different things. I prefer to make artisan loaf’s, but you can check the links at the end of the post for more recipes.
  4. Shape the dough into a ball  Let proof or rise for 4 to 24 hours. I usually like to make this the night before and let rise  on a piece of parchment paper over night with a clean dish towel over top. (You may want to add flour to the towel to keep it from possibly sticking) (It takes me about 10-20 minutes to prepare the dough.)
  5. After dough has rose. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees with the dutch oven INSIDE!
  6. Bake covered for 25 minutes. Then uncover it for the remainder of time. This takes roughly 45 minutes. Every oven is different. Check the internal temperature of the bread until it reaches 200-210 degrees. I usually pull mine right at 200 since it will continue to cook a little bit.
  7. Lastly, the hardest part! LET IT COOL!! Place on a cooling rack for at LEAST 15 minutes. This is very important. You must use a cooling rack, otherwise it will get soggy on the bottom. No one wants a soggy bottom. 😉
  8. ENJOY!

Please check below for all the science and other information about Sourdough starters! It really is an amazing process! 

The dough I chose from Cultures of Health: Originating near Paris, France, Parisian Sourdough Starter Culture makes a wonderful French bread. Easy to use. For best results, we recommend feeding your sourdough starter weekly.

This sourdough starter is available as a dried culture. Dried sourdough starters are shelf-stable and do not have to be fed or cared for immediately. Dried sourdough starters can be ready to create baked goods within 3 to 5 days.

Detailed instructions will be included with your order. Click here to view our Parisian Sourdough Starter instructions.

Q. What is sourdough?

A. Sourdough is an ancient method of capturing wild yeast to leaven baked goods. A sourdough culture is originally created by mixing flour and water and allowing the mixture to sit on a counter, preferably by an open window for a period of time to capture wild yeast. Once established a sourdough culture is easy to care for, can potentially last indefinitely, and can be used to create a variety of baked goods.

Q. Where did your sourdough cultures come from?

A. Our sourdough cultures originated all over the world and carry the unique yeasts from their respective geographic regions.

Q. What ingredients do your sourdough cultures contain?

A. Our sourdough cultures contain water, flour, and wild yeast. We use only organic flour and filtered water to perpetuate our sourdough cultures.

Q. Why use sourdough instead of commercial yeast?

A. Sourdough has several advantages over commercial yeast:

  • Sourdough is the most natural and traditional method for leavening baked goods. While commercial yeast is manufactured, sourdough is perpetuated through a natural process.
  • Sourdough naturally provides a more complex taste to baked goods.
  • Sourdough is more versatile. Depending on the amount of time you ferment the sourdough (see below), you can achieve a bread ranging from no hint of sourness to a very sour bread.
  • With a sourdough culture, you never again need to buy yeast. A small amount of flour and water each week will keep your sourdough culture fed and healthy.

Q. Are your sourdough cultures dairy-free? Vegan?

A. Our sourdough cultures contain no animal byproducts.

 Q. Do you carry a gluten-free sourdough starter?

A. At this time we offer a brown rice flour version of our New England Sourdough Starter. Please note: although this starter is maintained with brown rice flour, it may contain trace amounts of gluten. Click here to view a recipe for gluten-free sourdough bread.

Q. Are sourdough cultures reusable?

A. Yes, our sourdough cultures are traditional starter cultures and are meant to be used for many years. We even know someone who has had their sourdough culture for over 30 years!

Q. What are the primary differences between sourdough starters?

A. The primary differences between the sourdough cultures are the types of flour they were grown with (white, rye, whole wheat, etc.) and the different wild yeast from their respective geographic regions. Several cultures do have some unique properties:

  • Ischia tends to be a bit more sour when allowed to fully ferment.
  • New Zealand Rye sourdough is our fastest-proofing culture. (generally just under 3 hours: adjust your recipes accordingly).
  • Alaskan has an uncharacteristically short proof period.
  • Austrian has a longer proof period than most other sourdough cultures.
  • Many people claim the San Francisco sourdough culture has a particularly unique taste.
  • New Zealand, Swedish, and Danish cultures are made with rye flour.
  • Flemish-style Desem is made with whole wheat flour.

Click here to see a comparison chart of the different sourdough starters.

Q. Are your sourdough cultures very sour?

A. Actually no; they are only very slightly sour (with the exception of our Ischia sourdough culture which is just a bit more sour than our other sourdough cultures). Sourdough actually refers to a method of capturing and perpetuating wild yeast rather than the dominant taste which results. Our sourdough cultures come from all over the world and given the geographic differences, and different varieties of wild yeast available, each sourdough culture has its own unique taste. Sourdough provides a way to utilize wild rather than commercially grown and processed yeast in baked goods. It is also very cost-effective as it requires minimal care to perpetuate indefinitely. If you desire a truly sour taste to your baked goods, there is a method to develop the sourness of the sourdough culture for a specific baking project and instructions for doing so will be included with your order. Keep in mind that the sourdough bread purchased in most stores is not a true sourdough and rather has been made by adding a sour-tasting substance to the dough.

Q. How is working with sourdough different than working with commercial yeast?

A. There are a couple of fundamental differences between baking with sourdough and baking with yeast:

  • Sourdough does require minimal care (weekly feedings).
  • You do have to do a bit of advance planning to bake with sourdough as your starter will need to be fed 1 to 3 times prior to using it for baking. (See below for information on making “fresh starter” for recipes and for fermenting sourdough to achieve a more sour flavor.)
  • Sourdough requires a longer rise time than commercial yeast. Plan to allow your sourdough bread 4 to 24 hours to rise (depending on temperature, other environmental factors and desired sourness). If you do not have that much time to allow the bread to rise, a pinch (just a pinch!) of instant commercial yeast (make sure it’s the instant variety) will speed the rise process while retaining the complex sourdough flavor.

Q. What is “fresh sourdough starter” that is called for in most recipes?

A.  Fresh sourdough starter is a term often used in recipes to refer to recently fed, active sourdough starter. Refrigeration places the sourdough starter in a state of hibernation which allows a starter to go at least a week without being fed, but also yields the yeast temporarily ineffective as a leavening agent. To bring the starter out of cold-induced hibernation and ensure the yeast is active enough to properly leaven bread, the sourdough starter should be fed at least three times to fully activate the yeast prior to using the starter for a baking project.

  • Start the fresh starter process by removing 1/4 cup of sourdough starter from the refrigerator. (If a liquid layer has developed on top of your starter, pour off the liquid layer first.)
    • If using a kitchen scale: Add flour and water in amounts equal (by weight) to the amount of starter. For example, for 50 grams of sourdough starter, mix in 50 grams of flour and 50 grams of water. The scale method is preferred due to significant differences in flour density.
    • If using measuring cups: Use one part sourdough starter to one part water to a little less than two parts flour. For example, if you are starting with 1/4 cup of starter from the refrigerator, mix in 1/4 cup water and a scant 1/2 cup flour.
  • Cover and allow the mixture to sit for 4 to 12 hours until it has “proofed.” (The amount of time will depend primarily on the nature of the specific sourdough starter and room temperature.) Sourdough that has proofed becomes light and bubbly. The gas created often causes the sourdough starter to expand in size so be sure to use a sufficiently sized jar and set the jar on a paper towel to protect the surrounding surfaces in case the starter bubbles over. If the sourdough does not become bubbly within 12 hours, proceed with the next feeding.
  • Repeat this process at least two more times. For each feeding use equal amounts of starter, flour, and water by weight, or use the measuring cup ratios above. If you make too much sourdough starter during this process, prior to the next feeding some starter can be discarded or set aside to make sourdough pancakes.
  • If at any point during this process a liquid layer develops on the sourdough starter, pour off the liquid layer prior to the next feeding. The liquid layer is generally a sign the starter needs to be fed more often so feedings should be moved closer together (i.e., feed the starter every 8 hours instead of 12 hours, etc.).
  • Once the starter has been fed for at least three cycles and is bubbling reliably within several hours of being fed, measure out the portion needed for the recipe.
  • Be sure to add some of the extra fresh starter back to your master sourdough starter in the refrigerator. This process feeds the sourdough starter for the week.

http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-make-sourdough-bread

http://www.culturesforhealth.com/sourdough-faq

LIVING SATISFIED!

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Kimchi

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Hello Friends! Today I have a unique and delicious recipe from Homemade Mommy, Kimchi (or kimchee)! It is Korea’s national dish, and there are hundreds of varieties made with a main vegetable ingredient such as napa cabbage, radish, scallion, or cucumber. One serving provides over 50% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C and carotene. Kimchi is also rich in vitamin A, thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), calcium, and iron, and contains a number of lactic acid bacteria, among those the typical species Lactobacillus kimchiiHealth magazine named kimchi in its list of top five “World’s Healthiest Foods” for being rich in vitamins, aiding digestion, and even possibly reducing cancer growth.

I first tried kimchi at a local korean cafe named Soy Teriyaki Bistro. The special I got was called Bibimbap. I immediately fell in love! I could probably eat this everyday! Now Kimchi can be used on just about anything. Whether it is your breakfast with scrambling eggs with kimchi, diced tomatoes, and mushrooms…or use it as a wrap filling or to top a baked potato. It is a great toping with lots of healthy bacteria and vitamins!

Here is how you make it! Here is how I used it to make Bibimbap!

Ingredients

  • 1 large Napa cabbage
  • ½ cup salt
  • 1 Tbsp sweet rice powder (this might be labeled glutinous rice powder as well)
  • GLUTINOUS RICE FLOUR 1x16OZ [Hot Sale]

  • ½ cup water_DSC0351
  • 1 cup Korean red chile powder (coarse gochugaru)
  • Singsong Korean Hot Pepper Fine Type Powder, 1.10 Pound

  • ½ cup fish sauce (make sure the only two ingredients are anchovies and salt for a true fermented version vs. one that includes flavorings like MSG)
  • Red Boat Fish Sauce (8.45 ounce)

  • 2 Tbsp whole cane sugar (yes – sugar – this helps with the unique fermentation process of kimchi)
  • 1 3″ knob of fresh ginger
  • 1 daikon radish (200g) or 5-6 white salad turnips (this is what I used)
  • ¼ cup yellow onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup chopped green onions
  • ½ cup chopped carrots

Directions

Prepare the cabbage: Wash and remove the leaves from the core of the cabbage. Place cabbage leaves in a bowl of heavily salted water and let sit for 4-5 hours.

Prepare the rice powder: Add one heaping Tbsp of the glutinous rice powder to a sauce pot with ½ cup water and, whisking continuously, bring to a boil. When it turns to ‘glue’, turn off the heat and continue whisking until it cools down a bit. I removed it from the pan and put it in a bowl in the fridge to really chill out a bit while I tended to the rest of the recipe.

Prepare the vegetables: Add the ginger, daikon radish, yellow onion, garlic to a food processor and process into a thick paste.

Prepare the red chile paste: Whisk together the prepared rice powder, red chile, fish sauce and sugar. Add in the processed ingredients to create a thick red chile paste.

After the cabbage has rested, rinse the leaves with water and chop into 1-2 inch pieces and set aside. –

Prepare the kimchi: I did the kimchi in two batches. Place half the cabbage into a large bowl and add half of the carrots and green onions. Using gloves, add half of the red chile mixture to the cabbage, carrots and green onions and work it so that every bit of cabbage is covered with the sauce. Press down into a fermentation vessel of your choice. Repeat with the second batch. –

Fermentation: After two days, check on your kimchi and pack it down again. Taste it to see how it is doing. Continue tasting and packing it down every few days. You can stop whenever you want after 3-4 days and put it into the fridge, but I like to ferment it for at least a month. –

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Live Satisfied!!!